science-is
for-all-mankind:


An orbital sunrise brightens this view of space shuttle Discovery’s vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, docking mechanism, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay photographed by an STS-133 crew member on the shuttle during flight day 12 activities.
(link)

This picture looks surreal. It’s beautiful.

for-all-mankind:

An orbital sunrise brightens this view of space shuttle Discovery’s vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, docking mechanism, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay photographed by an STS-133 crew member on the shuttle during flight day 12 activities.

(link)

This picture looks surreal. It’s beautiful.

science

science:

Typically, planets much larger than Earth would be gas giants. That’s what we thought, anyway. But now astronomers have discovered an exoplanet seventeen times heavier than Earth, made up of rock and solids, some 560 light-years away. Not only is the planet exceptionally large for its composition, it’s also surprisingly old. Its parent solar system is 11 billion years old. In order to make the heavier elements needed to create an earthy planet, you require stellar nucleosynthesis—stars merging atomic nuclei into successively heavier elements until they explode, dispersing the mass, which can then form planets. There weren’t a whole lot of heavy elements present in the universe less than three billion years after the Big Bang, but apparently, there was enough to create Kepler-10c. Fascinating.

Think of the implications for life elsewhere in the universe. Although we have yet to confirm its existence, the conditions conducive to it could have appeared much earlier than one would have thought.

artandsciencejournal

artandsciencejournal:

Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!

A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.

Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.

A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.

Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.

Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!

-Anna Paluch

artandsciencejournal
artandsciencejournal:

Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium
Recycling has never been more fun!
Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!
Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.
Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.
There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 
There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.
If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.
-Anna Paluch

artandsciencejournal:

Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium

Recycling has never been more fun!

Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!

Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.

Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.

There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 

There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.

If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.

-Anna Paluch